Socket Sizes in Order From Smallest to Largest

You’d think that a list of socket sizes in order would be pretty simple. Well, there’s a bit more to it than that. Along with the two different measurement standards (metric and SAE), you also have to consider what size drive you’re using.

Whether you just got your first socket set, want to know which sizes you’re missing in your socket organizer, or simply need a quick reference to see if a metric size converts to SAE, check out the tables below to see the all socket sizes from smallest to largest.

Note: No single socket set will include all the sizes listed below nor would you ever need them all. Other sizes may be available but are probably too obscure to include.

Metric Socket Sizes Chart

1/4" Drive3/8" Drive1/2" Drive3/4" Drive1" Drive
4mm5.5mm8mm19mm36mm
4.5mm6mm9mm20mm38mm
5mm7mm10mm21mm41mm
5.5mm8mm11mm22mm46mm
6mm9mm12mm23mm50mm
7mm10mm13mm24mm54mm
8mm11mm14mm25mm55mm
9mm12mm15mm26mm58mm
10mm13mm16mm27mm60mm
11mm14mm17mm28mm63mm
12mm15mm18mm29mm65mm
13mm16mm19mm30mm67mm
14mm17mm20mm31mm70mm
15mm18mm21mm32mm71mm
19mm22mm33mm75mm
20mm23mm34mm77mm
21mm24mm35mm80mm
22mm25mm36mm
26mm38mm
27mm40mm
28mm41mm
30mm42mm

SAE Socket Sizes Chart

1/4" Drive3/8" Drive1/2" Drive3/4" Drive1" Drive
5/32"1/4"3/8"7/8"1-5/8"
3/16"5/16"7/16"15/16"1-11/16"
7/32"3/8"1/2"1"1-3/4"
1/4"7/16"9/16"1-1/16"1-13/16"
9/32"1/2"19/32"1-1/8"1-7/8"
5/16"9/16"5/8"1-3/16"2"
11/32"5/8"21/32"1-1/4"2-1/8"
3/8"11/16"11/16"1-5/16"2-3/16"
7/16"3/4"3/4"1-3/8"2-1/4"
1/2"13/16"25/32"1-7/16"2-3/8"
9/16"7/8"13/16"1-1/2"2-1/2"
15/16"7/8"1-5/8"2-5/8"
1"15/16"1-11/16"2-3/4"
1"1-3/4"2-15/16"
1-1/16"1-13/16"3"
1-1/8"1-7/8"3-1/8"
1-3/16"2"
1-1/4"2-1/8"
1-1/2"2-3/16"
2-1/4"

SAE to Metric Conversion Chart

Ever come across a nut or bolt where you need two of the same size wrench? Can't find a certain size of standard wrench or socket and want to know what the metric equivalent (or vice versa)? This chart will help.
SAE SizeMetric SizeInches Decimal 
5/32"0.1565/32" and 4mm are
close enough
4mm0.157
3/16"0.188
5mm0.197
7/32"0.219
6mm0.236
1/4"0.250
7mm0.276
9/32"0.281
5/16"0.3135/16" and 8mm are
close enough
8mm0.315
11/32"0.344
9mm0.354
3/8"0.375
10mm0.394
13/32"0.406
11mm0.4337/16" and 11mm are
close enough
7/16"0.438
15/32"0.46915/32" and 12mm are
close enough
12mm0.472
1/2"0.500
13mm0.512
17/32"0.531
14mm0.551
9/16"0.563
15mm0.59119/32" and 15mm are
close enough
19/32"0.594
5/8"0.625
16mm0.630
21/32"0.656
17mm0.669
11/16"0.688
18mm0.709
23/32"0.719
19mm0.7483/4" and 19mm are
close enough
3/4"0.750
25/32"0.781
20mm0.787
13/16"0.813
21mm0.827
27/32"0.844
22mm0.866
7/8"0.875
23mm0.90629/32" and 23mm are
close enough
29/32"0.906
15/16"0.938
24mm0.945
1"1.000

Drive Sizes

The drive size on a ratchet (aka: socket wrench) is the small square connection fitting at the end of the ratchet. This fitting accepts sockets of the same size. There are 3 common ratchet drive sizes used in shops and home garages but other drive sizes also exist.

1/4″ Drive

Used for low torque, precision, or interior work. Usually you want to use with a socket size 12mm or smaller (but up to 14mm for low torque applications).

3/8″ Drive

The most versatile and useful drive size for most people. Use it for engine work or all purpose use around your home. It allows you to apply quite a bit of torque yet fits in spots that a 1/2″ drive won’t. Generally, you’ll want to use with 12mm to 18mm sockets (or larger if the torque won’t be too high).

1/2″ Drive

Used for instances where a lot of torque is required such as a car’s lug nuts or exhaust system or if driving large lag bolts into your wall studs to install a flat screen TV. Generally used for 19mm and larger sockets or impact sockets.

Other Socket Drive Sizes

While most individuals will never need anything other than the three drive sizes above, ratchets with 3/4″, 1″, 1-1/2″, and higher drive sizes do exist. These are most often used for industrial applications or on vehicles such as large trucks, tractors, and tanks.

Looking for a list of wrench sizes along with a conversion chart?

See: Wrench Sizes in Order from Smallest to Largest


 

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Comments

    • Haha, yeah it just looks like a mess of numbers but feel free to ask a specific question if you want. We all have to start somewhere. The average person will never use most of these socket sizes though.

      • This chart helped me A BUNCH! I acquired 3 buckets of wrenches, sockets & drives from my dads collection and was trying to put together sets….. I have a tbi (traumatic brain injury) and numbers/math is one of my weaknesses now. So far I’ve put together 3 complete sets & am setting up a young man who loves to work on his Jeep. I’ll still have 2 sets of my own! Thank you !

  1. Outstanding list of sockets with the close enough sockets. I am going to use this list to inventory all my sockets.
    It would be helpful if you would list the different types of wrenches with the sizes, we could inventory our wrenches like we can with the sockets.

    Good job,
    Bob Minery

  2. I’m a lady trying to sort out all my grandpa’s tools since he passed away- I knew nothing about the sockets and wrenches all over the place, but wanted to make complete sets. This guide was indispensable. Thank you!

  3. I wish you would put the measurements side by side so I knew what one was metric and which one was SAE.

    • The SAE to Metric Conversion Chart above should have what you need. There are no “exact” equivalents with standard vs metric sizes so that’s the best I can do.

  4. Very helpful guide. My toolbox is now organized and I have a list of sockets I need doubles of (I always have two of each size and of each lengths (standard, half deep, full deep) in all drive sizes and in metric too. Always keep two of everything. Yes that includes two of each box wrenches. And ratchets which I keep three of each of. Adds up to a lot of sockets. But add a little at a time. This guide helps with that. Helps you keep inventory on what you need next…like 4.5 and 5.5mm never in any sets, etc. Big 1/4″ drive sockets and 6 and 12 point sockets to boot! Needless to say you need a pro box. Or three. But I am a NHRA race car mechanic this is my life. Thank you for the graph it being helpful is an understatement.

  5. Great site lots of really useful information.

    I visited looking for information about 9/32 drive sockets. I saw a ratchet on ebay and was inquisitive as to why this size was ever produced, it’s only .031 bigger than a 1/4 drive. There must be a logical explanation, or perhaps the 1/4 drive was just a natural evolution?

  6. Great guide, thank you for taking the time to put it together! I noticed a small error that I wanted to bring to the author’s attention – 1″ is missing from the table of 3/4″drive SAE sockets.

    Cheers!

  7. The odd size of some sockets and ratchets are called Wentworth. These are English sized, enough said.

    If you are working on an older British bike you either need wentworth or crecent wrench. it may say 1/2″…but it’s British 1/2″.

  8. I wanna get into DIY’ing, mainly working on my own vehicle. reading your article made me decide to go with 3/8″ drive, however im not sure what sizes is a must have in a set.

  9. friend (car mechanic) went to used tool sales, estate auctions, etc and gave me 4 tubs of assorted tools. I knew about 6 and 12 point sockets, deepwells, thin walled sockets that fit into a hole to get nut and bolt, but I also have a lot of hardened sockets for air compressor applications? Also got sets of brake wrenches? and some I do not know that they are used for. The hardened sockets are my main concern at this time. any info about those type?

    • Hardened sockets are essentially impact sockets made of hardened steel that can withstand high torque applications of air impact sockets (or cordless impact). They are much less prone to strip or break.

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